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Is anyone good at taking care of succulents? I need help/advice

@moonwater Marginally, but my advice is usually just "Water less than you think. Even less than that. Yes, less."

@moonwater I would love some advice too. I’ve legit killed all the plants I’ve ever had by accident and I love succulents 😭

@moonwater I'm great with succulents. They were my gateway plant.

@ajdunevent that’s good!! Do you have any advice? Idk what im doing wrong but mine keep dying. How often do you water them/what soil do you use if you don’t mind me asking

@moonwater

I grow most of my succulents in LECA (Hydroton brand) using passive hydroponics* and under three 24w spotlight style LED plant lights (iPower GLLEDXA24C).

While this has worked amazingly well for most of my succulents, a few (such as Euphorbia obesa and Lophophora williamsii) reacted very badly so I grow them in an off-the-shelf succulent mix amended heavily with perlite and pool filter sand. I use the same mix for my Stapeliads.

*Details to follow!

@moonwater

Regarding the passive hydroponics method I use (also called semi-hydroponics if you want to look into it more):

Each plant is in two plastic deli containers. The inner container has several holes poked through the bottom of it to allow liquids to drain rapidly. The outer container is spray painted with Krylon Fusion (after a small window is masked off so that the liquid level can be monitored more easily) to block out light (preventing algae) and look better.

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@moonwater

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The plant is planted in LECA within the inner container and the inner container is placed into the outer container. The outer container will hold a reservoir of dilute fertilizer (I just use Schultz Cactus Plus). The LECA wicks the solution up to the roots but, because the spheres can't pack too tightly, allows a lot of air around the roots, too.

This is great because the roots have a constant supply of water and nutrients but without drowning.

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@moonwater

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I keep about 2-4cm of solution in the reservoir, topping up with pure water as needed (to avoid a build up of fertilizer).

About once a month I remove the outer pot and completely empty the reservoir, run water through the inner pot to flush out any fertilizer build up (and dust, pet hair, fallen leaves, etc that may have landed in the container), then replace the outer pot and refill the reservoir.

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@moonwater

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It's an unusual system with a bit of an initial investment plus a transition period for the plants during which you just can't tell if they are adapting or dying...

BUT, for me, it works great. I can glance at my pots and tell if anyone needs water. No more under/over-watering!

I grow hundreds of plants with this method including orchids, gesneriads, myrmecophytes, aroids, Hoya, Ficus, Peperomia, Coffea, Pilea, and even Nepenthes.

I'm happy to answer any questions!

@ajdunevent okay awesome! That sounds really cool. I’ll give it a shot. Thank you!

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