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Pierogi

* Dough:
• wheat flour
• pinch of salt
• 1/2 tsp baking powder
• 1 tbsp olive oil
• water

Mix the dry ingredients, add the oil, and knead the water in gradually. You want to aim for a non-sticky cookie dough consistency. If you add too much water, add a little more flour.

* Filling:
A traditional filling for pierogi is a mixture of mashed potato, cream cheese, and fried onion.

* Construction:
(A rolling pin and floured surface helps, but I've done this by hand before)

1. Make the dough into several small balls.

2. One at a time, flatten the balls, add a spoonful of filling, and seal the edges by pressing them down with a fork. This is a little tedious, but makes a good group activity!

3a. If boiling the pierogi, add them carefully to a pan of boiling water until they float to the top.

3b. If frying, use a medium heat and fry both sides till golden.

4. Serve with black pepper and sour cream.

food • recipe • addition 

Cheese and potato is a common filling, but you can add all kinds of things to these. They sometimes include meat or other vegetables, and some places in Poland serve sweet ones.

One filling I used which was particularly nice was pumpkin and goat cheese, with a little paprika.

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food • recipe • addition 

@InvaderXan Looking foward to trying this. I love eating them but I’ve never tried making them. I also love lentil dishes, so I’ll be giving the previous recipe a try too.

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@pkla_sarracenia I hope you enjoy them both! ☀️

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@InvaderXan I’m sure I will. Thanks for sharing.

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@InvaderXan is that a bag with food or a art of bread ?

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@Pinguinsreisende
In English, we'd call it a dumpling. Though I'm not sure if Knödel has quite the same meaning in German.
de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pirogge

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@InvaderXan ok du kannst auch deutsch ? Dann brauch mir ja keinen abbrechen 🤪 danke für deine antwort 😃

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@Pinguinsreisende Ehhh, nur ein bisschen, und nicht sehr gut. Sorry. Glad I could help though!

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@InvaderXan oh, is no problem .... but my english very bad

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@InvaderXan thank you for posting this! i always forget these exist, eventhough they were one of the first food-things i ever made. back when i was a little kid my old aunt came from the ukraine to visit my family and taught me how to make them (and also the russian words for all the ingredients). i was so proud when i was able to recreate what she did! after seeing your post i made some yesterday, for the first time in 15+ years. :)

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@InvaderXan oh, and i also used my favorite filling from back then, and it still holds up, and it's...sauerkraut. it sounds terrible, but is actually quite tasty. 😁

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@aurora @InvaderXan Damn, need to follow my Polish heritage again …

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@aurora Oh, Ukrainian dumplings! Vareniky, right? A friend of mine was telling me about these. Also I kinda love sauerkraut pierogi (or choucroute here in France). Though I guess it's not for everyone!

Glad I could inspire you to cook some, anyway. How did they turn out?

food • recipe 

@InvaderXan looking back it's kinda confusing - my aunt called them Pirozhki, but they were made without yeast, so i guess it was closer to Vareniky? I don't really know, most of her recipes are hard to recreate as they were a cultural mess (just like my family, they weren't really Ukrainian, they just ended up there - grandma was from the russian far east).

the ones I made turned out really well, I liked them. :)

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@aurora Speaking as a cultural mess myself, this is one of the most interesting ways to be! :flow:

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@InvaderXan Thanks for posting this recipe! Sounds feasable, even for my skill level of ”please don‘t hurt yourself or burn down the kitchen“.

What I am missing is amounts for flour and water. Or at least a ratio.

I‘m always having a super hard time with cooking terms as they‘re often very imprecise and I have no idea how to interpret them.

So if you could give me some amounts in g and ml that would help me a great deal!

Thanks!

food • recipe 

@MacLemon Honestly, I never measure amounts. I don't even have any kitchen scales. Even if I did, ingredients vary, so using a precise measurement may not give you an ideal. That's why things are imprecise. It's also why some people follow a recipe precisely, don't get a good result, and decide that it's because they're bad at cooking.

I usually start with a cup or two of flour. Add water little by little until you get the right consistency. If you add too much water, add a little more flour to balance it.

A basic recipe I found uses 250 g of flour and 150 ml of water. But remember, it's a guideline and not an absolute rule. Getting the right consistency for the dough is the important part.

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@InvaderXan I'm well aware that cooking is not an “exact science”. The 250g flour and 150ml water is exactly the helpful guidance I asked for. Thanks!

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