Yesterday I wrote the modulus operator for the WDR Paper Computer[1].

It's a tiny computer with only 5 instructions: add1, sub1, jump to line#, end program, and is-zero?.

My conclusions so far about paper computing:
- It's really fun to figure out clever ways to write programs using a limited instruction set!
- Running programs by hand is pretty tedious and gets old fast. ^__^

[1] en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WDR_pape

@tty register machines are tedious to handle by hand, next you should try a stack machine :)

Follow

@neauoire uxn spoiled me! Stack-style is much easier to work with imo.

Β· Β· 1 Β· 0 Β· 1

@neauoire Though I think a stack machine with this instruction set would still be challenging to write programs with and run by hand.

@tty It's not too bad, before writing the uxn vm, I "played" it on paper.

wiki.xxiivv.com/site/papier.ht

The WDR Paper Computer can be modified to not use registers at all, and instead use the stack primitives POP DUP SWP

Sign in to participate in the conversation
Sunbeam City 🌻

Sunbeam City is a anticapitalist, antifascist solarpunk instance that is run collectively.